Charlotte Brontë: A Modernist Poet?

Imagism is a strand of Modernism, born from the poetry of T. E. Hulme and chiefly associated with literary figures such as Ezra Pound and Hilda Doolittle. Pound’s poem, ‘In a Station of the Metro’, emphasises the Imagist’s belief that poetry should be expressed with clarity using precise visual imagery: Pound’s blunt expression was a reaction against traditional Romantic […]

Read more "Charlotte Brontë: A Modernist Poet?"

Call for Papers: Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth Century.

Call for Papers: Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth Century.  University of Hull, 20th-21st May 2015.  Keynotes: Doctor Holly Furneaux and Professor Joanne Bailey.  To commemorate the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo and the lasting impact of the Napoleonic Wars upon the history of militarism, submissions are welcomed for ‘Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth […]

Read more "Call for Papers: Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth Century."

Making Sense of War in Charlotte and Branwell Brontë’s Juvenilia.

Many scholars ignore the Brontës’ juvenilia, and it’s not surprising. The intricate web the young siblings wove in their respective kingdoms of Glasstown/Angria & Gondal is complicated and dense. Today’s post is going to be about Glasstown, Angria and, the main driving force in Charlotte and Branwell’s saga, war. Although war within Emily and Anne’s Gondal […]

Read more "Making Sense of War in Charlotte and Branwell Brontë’s Juvenilia."